Technology Hoping to Decrease Auto Accidents for Teens

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(NBC) More than 30-thousand people in the u-s die every year in an automobile accident.

New technology is hoping to put a dent in that number.

Jay Gray has the latest on digital ways to stay focused, avoid crashes and keep an eye on new drivers.

Young drivers carry the highest risk of accidents, but automakers hope new technology can lessen that chance.

“GM is offering an optional system on some 2016 Chevrolet Malibu models that will let parents track how well … or how badly their teenagers are driving.” says Julianne Pepitone, senior tech writer for nbcnews.com

The “teen driver” system allows parents to set speed limits, reminders, audio controls and even check performance reports. For older model cars, other apps and devices can help.

“Our Delphi connect will allow you to plug in to a model car 1996 or newer,” explains Jonathan Moss of Verizon.

It’s a device that tracks stats like diagnostic information and even the location of the car, “based on your location it will send alert to parent to show they’re speeding,” Moss further explains.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is also testing automatic braking technology, sensors in the front of a car that could stop crashes before they happen.

Executive vice president of IIHS David Zuby said, “it first issues a warning, hoping to get the driver to step on the brakes or take some evasive maneuver.”

If the driver doesn’t, the system automatically applies the brakes.

Virtual reality’s being employed to try to discourage distracted driving. It’s a factor in more than half of teen crashes according to AAA.

“This is a high tech simulation that feels like you’re behind the wheel and shows how something terrible can happen if you look down at your phone for just a second” said Pepitone

The AT&T simulator can show teens the consequences of distracted driving, before it happens in real life.

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