SC high court hears 1st suit in monument protection law

South Carolina News

FILE – In this July 10, 2017 file photo, Cameron Maynard stands at attention by the monument to Confederate soldiers at the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C. The South Carolina Supreme Court, on Tuesday, May 25, 2021, is hearing arguments on whether a 2000 law protecting Confederate and other historical monuments from being removed or changed is legal. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The South Carolina Supreme Court has heard its first challenge to the state law protecting Confederate and other historical monuments since it passed 21 years ago.

Justices on Tuesday questioned not only if the entire Heritage Act was constitutional, but if a clause that requires a two-thirds vote of the Legislature to remove or alter any monument is legal.

Lawyers for the state say if the two-thirds requirement is found unconstitutional, a clause in the law allows the rest of it to stand.

The people suing over the act say it illegally prevents local governments from running their own affairs.

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