Savannah State University apologizes after sending out email denying admission to 4,019 previously accepted students

Local News

SAVANNAH, Ga (WSAV) – An email sent out to thousands of students from the Savannah State University’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions caused panic, confusion, and anger.

An Atlanta mom told WSAV News 3 that her daughter was denied enrollment seven months after receiving her original acceptance letter.

According to the Vice President of Marketing and Communications, 9,144 letters of admission status were emailed to a list of fall applicants on Saturday, July 11, informing them that they were not accepted to the university. Due to a “human-filtering error,” 4,019 students who had previously been accepted to SSU incorrectly received the email.

“We made all those arrangements you know, to make sure we’re in Savannah by [August] 11th, so that morning of the 12th, all I had to do was move her in and kiss her goodbye,” said Stephanie Sims. “I feel helpless for my child.”

Sims’ daughter, Sierra, had been accepted to the university, her number one choice, on December 5. Sierra received her fall schedule, a move-in date, and her tuition bill all the night before, on Friday, July 10.

The university’s VP of Communications, Annette Ogletree-McDougal, told News 3 that the admissions office sent letters of apology acknowledging this error to the accepted students, approximately one hour later. Sims said that the email went to her daughter’s spam folder.

“I do hope the individuals from Savannah State reach out to me and my daughter and explain what happened, and offer an apology and to assure me she is going to be safe and alright if I decide to let her still attend there and actually be on campus,” said Sims.

Ogletree-McDougal said the office is reviewing current processes to help ensure this error does not happen again.

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