New allegations in suspended Georgia DA case raise questions about cocaine use

Georgia News

COLUMBUS, Ga. (WRBL) – Suspended District Attorney Mark Jones asked a person that the state refers to as a “contact” for a location where he could purchase and obtain cocaine the Georgia Attorney General’s office alleges in new motions filed late Tuesday.

The filing states this incident occurred in July of 2021, while Jones was the elected District Attorney of the Chattahoochee Valley Judicial Circuit. The filing said the incident happened after Jones was intoxicated late one night. The evidence alleges around 3:00 a.m. Jones began banging on The Hooch’s doors, a bar located in downtown Columbus, Jones’ was asking for his keys which employees of the establishment told him they did not have.

The motion alleges prior bad acts by Jones and the state is asking Houston County Superior Court Judge Katherine K. Lumsden to admit it as evidence in a criminal wrong doing trial that is scheduled to start on November 8th.

When contacted for comment on the new allegations, Jones’ Defense Attorney Christopher Breault said he’s eager to examining the prosecution and their claims in court.

“Three weeks ago, the authorities coached witnesses who came to court and gave false testimony—including their star witness who perjured herself in open court.  If they will do it in one case (the Civic Center Donut Case), then they will do it in others.  I take anything said by these people with a grain of salt, and look forward for examining them in open court.”

Here’s what the evidence in the most recent evidence claims:

Jones quote “kept screaming that he was the district attorney, and he would shut down the bar. A contact of Jones’ gave Jones a ride home…”

The evidence states defendant Jones “kept screaming that he was the District Attorney, and he would shut down the bar.” It was after this that Jones received a ride home from a contact. The filing also said Jones thanked this contact for the ride and offered them a “free felony” before asking where he could purchase cocaine.

The filing states: “The driver refused to help Jones obtain cocaine.”

The Georgia Attorney Generals Office is citing Rule 404 (b) as part of their argument for the admission of this evidence in the criminal case against Jones. Rule 404 (b) reads as follows:

“Evidence of other crimes, wrongs, or acts shall not be admissible to prove the character of a person in order to show action in conformity therewith. It may, however, be admissible for other purposes, including, but not limited to, proof of motive, opportunity, intent, preparation, plan, knowledge, identity, or absence of mistake or accident.”

In citing Rule 404 (b) the prosecution states quote:

“This evidence directly explains the Defendant’s behavior as the District Attorney: the Defendant’s intent is to abuse his power.”

The state also said they acknowledge there is some prejudicial effect to this evidence, but they believe its probative value outweighs this and therefore should be admitted as evidence.

This filing comes on the heels of the state motioning for a bond modification to Jones’ bond last week.

Jones’ previous bond restricted him from consuming alcohol as a condition of the $10,000 bond. The motion filed last Wednesday by Deputy Attorney General John Fowler also adds that Jones “shall not possess or consume illegal drugs.”

Here are the previous motions the state has filed:

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