Heartwarming story: 9 year old gives boy in wheelchair his - Local news, weather, sports Savannah | WSAV On Your Side

Heartwarming story: 9 year old gives boy in wheelchair his prized J.J. Watt autographed football

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HOUSTON, TX (AP) -

It's a heartwarming story of selflessness and giving to a stranger.  A Houston area boy finally got something he really wanted, a football autographed by Houston Texans player J.J. Watt, then turned around and gave it to a complete stranger.

9 year old Kayne Ortiz plays quarterback for the South Houston Wildcats.  If you ask him how important football is to him, you'll get this answer:

"It's like the most important thing because you can finally hit someone without getting in trouble," said Kayne Ortiz.

Like thousands of others, earlier this month Kayne went to a Texans workout and his only goal was to close to JJ Watt:

"We were waiting forever to get his autograph and then he finally came around and I was like yes," said Kayne.

But as Kayne and his family were leaving, someone caught his eye.

"And then I saw a boy in a wheelchair who was trying really hard to get it and he couldn't.  So that's why I was like, mom I want to give this to the boy in the wheelchair," said Kayne.

This is the picture that his mom snapped as Kayne gave his ball to 15 year old
Zuriel Sanchez who suffers from Spina Bifada.

"You know I was shocked because he has been wanting that forever and then for him, it's something valuable, to be okay with giving it up to make someone else happy you know.  That was a really proud moment.  I was in tears," said Cynthia Ortiz, Kayne's mother.

This week the two young J.J. Watt fans reunited in Houston.  Zuriel now has his coveted J.J. Watt ball safely place in a plexi-glass case.  He and his family will never forget what little Kayne did for him.

"You know, when I was going home, Kayne came up to me and told me he wanted to give me his football and I felt excited because no one had ever like done that to me," said Zuriel Sanchez, who suffers from Spina Bifada.

" It was a really nice gesture because not everyone does that often.  You don't ever see someone do that and just hand them something, you know," said Andrea Sanchez, Zureil's Sister.

If you ask Kayne what he things about the kind act:

"If you do something nice for someone it will, it will help you later on and it will help you later on in life, because if your nice and generous, God will bless you for that," said Kayne.

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