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Language problems common for kids with ADHD

Children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are nearly three times more likely to have language problems than kids without ADHD, according to new research. More>>

Too little sleep may add to teen health problems

Many teens from lower- and middle-income homes get too little sleep, potentially adding to the problems of kids already at risk for health issues, new research finds. More>>

If kids think someone's watching, they're more likely to wash their hands

Hand washing is one of the best ways to prevent infectious diseases, and placing cameras over sinks might boost youngsters' hand hygiene, new research suggests. More>>

Childhood obesity adds nearly $20k to lifetime medical costs

Over a lifetime, direct medical costs for an obese 10-year-old will be nearly $20,000 higher than those of slimmer peers, according to new research. More>>

Could dads' obesity raise autism risk for kids?

Children born to obese fathers, but not obese mothers, may have a slightly higher risk of autism than kids with thinner dads, a large new study suggests. More>>

So long snow, hello pollen

Although it still feels like winter in many parts of the United States, it's time to prepare for spring allergies, an expert says. More>>

Having kids walk to school comes with risks, benefits

Many parents are understandably worried about letting their kids walk or bike to school. More>>

Teens' screen time may affect their bone health

Spending too much time sitting in front of screens may be linked to poorer bone health in teens, according to a new study from Norway. More>>

Stronger muscles may mean better health for kids

Preteens with strong muscles may have healthier blood pressure, cholesterol and body-fat levels than their less brawny peers, a new study suggests. More>>

Smoking bans linked to drop in premature births, kids' asthma attacks

Bans on smoking in public places and the workplace in North America and Europe are linked to a 10 percent drop in premature births and the number of children going to the hospital for an asthma flare-up. More>>

Toddlers who sleep less may eat more

Toddlers who get too little sleep tend to eat more and are at increased risk for obesity, a new study indicates. More>>

When moms get active, kids follow

Want to keep your little kids active? A new study suggests that mothers may be the key: Preschool children with more active moms appear more likely to be active themselves. More>>

Allergy season springs into bloom

Many people are happy to see the end of this long, cold winter, but those with pollen allergies might not greet spring with open arms. More>>

ADHD drugs linked to later weight gain in kids

Children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to gain more weight than their peers as they enter their teen years, a new study finds. More>>

Mental illness to blame for 10 percent of kids' hospitalizations

Nearly 10 percent of children hospitalized in America are there because of a mental health problem, a new study finds. More>>

Does your child's car seat weigh too much for LATCH?

Car seats are heavier than ever--and some parents aren't including that weight when they fit their kids and car seats to LATCH systems. More>>

Treatment costs vary for U.S. children born with heart defects

The cost of treatment for children born with heart defects varies widely across the United States, according to new research. And higher costs may not mean better care. More>>

'Eating for two' during pregnancy could pack on too many pounds

Overweight or obese pregnant women who believe they are "eating for two" are more likely to gain too much weight, a new study shows. More>>

Food allergies have nearly doubled among black children

Over the past two decades, reports of food allergies have nearly doubled among black children, a new study reveals. More>>

Schools add more fruits, veggies to the '3 Rs'

Under new U.S. guidelines on school lunches, low-income students are eating more fruits and vegetables, according to a new study. More>>

Baby 'sleep machines' could damage hearing

Some of the "sleep machines" marketed to soothe infants seem capable of generating enough noise to potentially damage a baby's hearing, a new study suggests. More>>

Graco recalling nearly 3.8M child car seats

Updated:

Graco is recalling nearly 3.8 million car safety seats because children can get trapped by buckles that may not unlatch. But the company has drawn the ire of federal safety regulators who say the recall should include another 1.8 million rear-facing car seats designed for infants. More>>

Infants at highest risk for childhood burns

One-year-old infants are 10 times more likely to suffer burns and scalds than older children, and the main causes of these injuries are hot drinks and hair irons, a new British study finds. More>>

U.S. teens eat too much salt, hiking obesity risk

American teens are taking in as much dietary salt as adults, far exceeding guidelines on healthy limits for daily consumption, new research warns. More>>

Expectant mothers' colds may affect baby

The more colds and other viral infections a woman has during pregnancy, the more likely her child is to have asthma, researchers report. More>>

Are electronic devices making kids nearsighted?

Updated:

(CBS Pittsburg) Computers, tablets, cell phones - is all this focusing on tiny electronic devices taking a toll on our childrens' eyes? "The parents come in here and say, 'oh, I was in sixth grade when More>>

Gov't wants to update food labels

America's food labels may get their first makeover in more than 20 years. More>>

Twenty U.S. kids hospitalized each day for gun injuries

Gunshot wounds send about 20 children to the hospital every single day in the United States, a new study says. More>>

Just for Kids Campaign to focus on asthma and other respiratory illnesses

(WJHL) - Niswonger Children's Hospital and WJHL are developing and implementing an educational campaign about asthma and other respiratory illnesses including RSV through vignettes and public service announcements to be broadcast on WJHL. The announcements will also be on wjhl.com/justforkids which will include more in depth information with links to the Niswonger Children's Hospital informative web site. In addition, Niswonger Children's Hospital professionals will periodically be live o... More>>

1 in 10 U.S. children now has ADHD

One in every 10 U.S. children has been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the steady rise in cases has started to slow, a new government survey shows. More>>

Breast milk with solid foods might stave off allergies

Giving babies solid food while still breast-feeding, and waiting until 17 weeks to do so, might protect the infants from food allergies, British researchers say. More>>

Exercise in pregnancy may boost baby's brain

Moderate exercise during pregnancy may boost your baby's brain development, according to new research. More>>

Simple method may help predict tiny preemies' outlook

Doctors may be able to look at a few simple factors to better predict how very premature babies will fare in the short term, a new study suggests. More>>

Many more kids visiting ER for sports concussions

Many more children are showing up at emergency departments with traumatic brain injuries -- such as concussions -- from sports activities, a new study finds. More>>

Top 5 ways to work at home with young kids

The following tips can be used as a template to help level the work-at-home playing field. More>>

  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...
  • Just For KidsMore>>

  • Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Iron deficiency anemia, or IDA is a blood disorder caused by a lack of iron in the body
    Iron deficiency anemia, or IDA is a blood disorder caused by a lack of iron in the body
  • E. Coli Infections

    E. Coli Infections

    E. coli is a bacteria and some strains are harmless and are naturally found in our intestinal tract. E. coli can spread through contaminated food or water or by other people who are infected. 
    E. coli is a bacteria and some strains are harmless and are naturally found in our intestinal tract. E. coli can spread through contaminated food or water or by other people who are infected. 
  • Teen Sleep Cycles

    Teen Sleep Cycles

    It is recommended that teens get 9 hours of sleep each night. But puberty changes a teen’s internal clock delaying the time he or she starts feeling sleepy. 
    It is recommended that teens get 9 hours of sleep each night. But puberty changes a teen’s internal clock delaying the time he or she starts feeling sleepy. 
  • Inhalant Abuse

    Inhalant Abuse

    Peer pressure sometimes leads to drug and substance abuse. Inhalants provide a convenient way of getting high.
    Peer pressure sometimes leads to drug and substance abuse. Inhalants provide a convenient way of getting high.
  • About Just For Kids

    About Just For Kids

    Niswonger Children's Hospital and WJHL are developing and implementing an educational campaign of safety information through vignettes and public service announcements to be broadcast on WJHL.
    Niswonger Children's Hospital and WJHL are developing and implementing an educational campaign of safety information through vignettes and public service announcements to be broadcast on WJHL.
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